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Can Drinking Red Wine Slow the Effects of Dementia?

Can Drinking Red Wine Slow the Effects of Dementia?

A new study has shown another potential benefit of resveratrol: reduced risk of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia

As if we needed another excuse to drink red wine.

Add “improving your memory” to the growing list of health benefits associated with drinking red wine. A new study published by researchers at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California in Los Angeles hypothesizes that resveratrol, the good stuff found in red wine, is associated with fighting the negative effects of Alzheimer’s, dementia, and other regenerative neurological illnesses.

The study was not wide-ranging by any means, and only studied the cognitive effects of red wine on five men and women between the ages of 66 and 82 who had mild memory and dementia issues. The group was divided in half: a placebo group and one that consumed freeze-dried powder made from California wine grapes, containing a quantity of resveratrol approximately equal to that in a glass-and-a-half of red wine. The research team found that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits of resveratrol helped to stimulate activity in the brain.

"Each region participates in different cognitive abilities," explained Dr. Daniel Silverman, head of the Neuronuclear Imaging Section at UCLA and the lead author of the study, according to Wine Spectator. "We looked at regions of the brain that we knew [activity] would go down if a person was in the early stages of memory decline due to something like Alzheimer's."


One Major Side Effect of Drinking Red Wine, Says New Study

It's well-known that drinking wine in moderation may have several science-backed health benefits. As Kelli McGrane, MS, RD, a registered dietitian for the food-tracking app Lose It! explained to us, moderate wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, is known to help protect against diabetes, and may help increase your body's level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. One study published in the journal BMC Medicine even found that people who drink between two and seven glasses of wine per week were less likely to suffer from depression.

But, according to a study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University and published in December in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, there's yet another positive side effect to drinking wine—well, red wine, specifically—and consider it an added bonus that you can pair it with cheese and still reap the health benefits. The study, which drew on data of nearly 2,000 adults from the UK Biobank, found that drinking red wine and eating cheese was associated with greater cognitive acuity "in our later years."

"I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down," said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State. "While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways."

For the study, participants completed multiple "Fluid Intelligence Tests (FIT)," which, according to the researchers, "provide an in-time snapshot of an individual's ability to 'think on the fly,'" and also reported their food-and-alcohol consumption. The diet questionnaire specifically asked them about their daily intake of "fresh fruit, dried fruit, raw vegetables and salad, cooked vegetables, oily fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereal, tea and coffee, beer and cider, red wine, white wine and champaign and liquor," said the study.

Read on for the "four most significant findings" that the researchers discovered in this study. And for some clear reasons why you shouldn't overdo it in the wine department, make sure you read up on the Ugly Effects of Drinking Wine You Don't Even Know About, According to Experts.


One Major Side Effect of Drinking Red Wine, Says New Study

It's well-known that drinking wine in moderation may have several science-backed health benefits. As Kelli McGrane, MS, RD, a registered dietitian for the food-tracking app Lose It! explained to us, moderate wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, is known to help protect against diabetes, and may help increase your body's level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. One study published in the journal BMC Medicine even found that people who drink between two and seven glasses of wine per week were less likely to suffer from depression.

But, according to a study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University and published in December in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, there's yet another positive side effect to drinking wine—well, red wine, specifically—and consider it an added bonus that you can pair it with cheese and still reap the health benefits. The study, which drew on data of nearly 2,000 adults from the UK Biobank, found that drinking red wine and eating cheese was associated with greater cognitive acuity "in our later years."

"I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down," said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State. "While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways."

For the study, participants completed multiple "Fluid Intelligence Tests (FIT)," which, according to the researchers, "provide an in-time snapshot of an individual's ability to 'think on the fly,'" and also reported their food-and-alcohol consumption. The diet questionnaire specifically asked them about their daily intake of "fresh fruit, dried fruit, raw vegetables and salad, cooked vegetables, oily fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereal, tea and coffee, beer and cider, red wine, white wine and champaign and liquor," said the study.

Read on for the "four most significant findings" that the researchers discovered in this study. And for some clear reasons why you shouldn't overdo it in the wine department, make sure you read up on the Ugly Effects of Drinking Wine You Don't Even Know About, According to Experts.


One Major Side Effect of Drinking Red Wine, Says New Study

It's well-known that drinking wine in moderation may have several science-backed health benefits. As Kelli McGrane, MS, RD, a registered dietitian for the food-tracking app Lose It! explained to us, moderate wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, is known to help protect against diabetes, and may help increase your body's level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. One study published in the journal BMC Medicine even found that people who drink between two and seven glasses of wine per week were less likely to suffer from depression.

But, according to a study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University and published in December in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, there's yet another positive side effect to drinking wine—well, red wine, specifically—and consider it an added bonus that you can pair it with cheese and still reap the health benefits. The study, which drew on data of nearly 2,000 adults from the UK Biobank, found that drinking red wine and eating cheese was associated with greater cognitive acuity "in our later years."

"I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down," said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State. "While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways."

For the study, participants completed multiple "Fluid Intelligence Tests (FIT)," which, according to the researchers, "provide an in-time snapshot of an individual's ability to 'think on the fly,'" and also reported their food-and-alcohol consumption. The diet questionnaire specifically asked them about their daily intake of "fresh fruit, dried fruit, raw vegetables and salad, cooked vegetables, oily fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereal, tea and coffee, beer and cider, red wine, white wine and champaign and liquor," said the study.

Read on for the "four most significant findings" that the researchers discovered in this study. And for some clear reasons why you shouldn't overdo it in the wine department, make sure you read up on the Ugly Effects of Drinking Wine You Don't Even Know About, According to Experts.


One Major Side Effect of Drinking Red Wine, Says New Study

It's well-known that drinking wine in moderation may have several science-backed health benefits. As Kelli McGrane, MS, RD, a registered dietitian for the food-tracking app Lose It! explained to us, moderate wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, is known to help protect against diabetes, and may help increase your body's level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. One study published in the journal BMC Medicine even found that people who drink between two and seven glasses of wine per week were less likely to suffer from depression.

But, according to a study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University and published in December in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, there's yet another positive side effect to drinking wine—well, red wine, specifically—and consider it an added bonus that you can pair it with cheese and still reap the health benefits. The study, which drew on data of nearly 2,000 adults from the UK Biobank, found that drinking red wine and eating cheese was associated with greater cognitive acuity "in our later years."

"I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down," said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State. "While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways."

For the study, participants completed multiple "Fluid Intelligence Tests (FIT)," which, according to the researchers, "provide an in-time snapshot of an individual's ability to 'think on the fly,'" and also reported their food-and-alcohol consumption. The diet questionnaire specifically asked them about their daily intake of "fresh fruit, dried fruit, raw vegetables and salad, cooked vegetables, oily fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereal, tea and coffee, beer and cider, red wine, white wine and champaign and liquor," said the study.

Read on for the "four most significant findings" that the researchers discovered in this study. And for some clear reasons why you shouldn't overdo it in the wine department, make sure you read up on the Ugly Effects of Drinking Wine You Don't Even Know About, According to Experts.


One Major Side Effect of Drinking Red Wine, Says New Study

It's well-known that drinking wine in moderation may have several science-backed health benefits. As Kelli McGrane, MS, RD, a registered dietitian for the food-tracking app Lose It! explained to us, moderate wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, is known to help protect against diabetes, and may help increase your body's level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. One study published in the journal BMC Medicine even found that people who drink between two and seven glasses of wine per week were less likely to suffer from depression.

But, according to a study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University and published in December in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, there's yet another positive side effect to drinking wine—well, red wine, specifically—and consider it an added bonus that you can pair it with cheese and still reap the health benefits. The study, which drew on data of nearly 2,000 adults from the UK Biobank, found that drinking red wine and eating cheese was associated with greater cognitive acuity "in our later years."

"I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down," said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State. "While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways."

For the study, participants completed multiple "Fluid Intelligence Tests (FIT)," which, according to the researchers, "provide an in-time snapshot of an individual's ability to 'think on the fly,'" and also reported their food-and-alcohol consumption. The diet questionnaire specifically asked them about their daily intake of "fresh fruit, dried fruit, raw vegetables and salad, cooked vegetables, oily fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereal, tea and coffee, beer and cider, red wine, white wine and champaign and liquor," said the study.

Read on for the "four most significant findings" that the researchers discovered in this study. And for some clear reasons why you shouldn't overdo it in the wine department, make sure you read up on the Ugly Effects of Drinking Wine You Don't Even Know About, According to Experts.


One Major Side Effect of Drinking Red Wine, Says New Study

It's well-known that drinking wine in moderation may have several science-backed health benefits. As Kelli McGrane, MS, RD, a registered dietitian for the food-tracking app Lose It! explained to us, moderate wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, is known to help protect against diabetes, and may help increase your body's level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. One study published in the journal BMC Medicine even found that people who drink between two and seven glasses of wine per week were less likely to suffer from depression.

But, according to a study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University and published in December in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, there's yet another positive side effect to drinking wine—well, red wine, specifically—and consider it an added bonus that you can pair it with cheese and still reap the health benefits. The study, which drew on data of nearly 2,000 adults from the UK Biobank, found that drinking red wine and eating cheese was associated with greater cognitive acuity "in our later years."

"I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down," said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State. "While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways."

For the study, participants completed multiple "Fluid Intelligence Tests (FIT)," which, according to the researchers, "provide an in-time snapshot of an individual's ability to 'think on the fly,'" and also reported their food-and-alcohol consumption. The diet questionnaire specifically asked them about their daily intake of "fresh fruit, dried fruit, raw vegetables and salad, cooked vegetables, oily fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereal, tea and coffee, beer and cider, red wine, white wine and champaign and liquor," said the study.

Read on for the "four most significant findings" that the researchers discovered in this study. And for some clear reasons why you shouldn't overdo it in the wine department, make sure you read up on the Ugly Effects of Drinking Wine You Don't Even Know About, According to Experts.


One Major Side Effect of Drinking Red Wine, Says New Study

It's well-known that drinking wine in moderation may have several science-backed health benefits. As Kelli McGrane, MS, RD, a registered dietitian for the food-tracking app Lose It! explained to us, moderate wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, is known to help protect against diabetes, and may help increase your body's level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. One study published in the journal BMC Medicine even found that people who drink between two and seven glasses of wine per week were less likely to suffer from depression.

But, according to a study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University and published in December in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, there's yet another positive side effect to drinking wine—well, red wine, specifically—and consider it an added bonus that you can pair it with cheese and still reap the health benefits. The study, which drew on data of nearly 2,000 adults from the UK Biobank, found that drinking red wine and eating cheese was associated with greater cognitive acuity "in our later years."

"I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down," said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State. "While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways."

For the study, participants completed multiple "Fluid Intelligence Tests (FIT)," which, according to the researchers, "provide an in-time snapshot of an individual's ability to 'think on the fly,'" and also reported their food-and-alcohol consumption. The diet questionnaire specifically asked them about their daily intake of "fresh fruit, dried fruit, raw vegetables and salad, cooked vegetables, oily fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereal, tea and coffee, beer and cider, red wine, white wine and champaign and liquor," said the study.

Read on for the "four most significant findings" that the researchers discovered in this study. And for some clear reasons why you shouldn't overdo it in the wine department, make sure you read up on the Ugly Effects of Drinking Wine You Don't Even Know About, According to Experts.


One Major Side Effect of Drinking Red Wine, Says New Study

It's well-known that drinking wine in moderation may have several science-backed health benefits. As Kelli McGrane, MS, RD, a registered dietitian for the food-tracking app Lose It! explained to us, moderate wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, is known to help protect against diabetes, and may help increase your body's level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. One study published in the journal BMC Medicine even found that people who drink between two and seven glasses of wine per week were less likely to suffer from depression.

But, according to a study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University and published in December in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, there's yet another positive side effect to drinking wine—well, red wine, specifically—and consider it an added bonus that you can pair it with cheese and still reap the health benefits. The study, which drew on data of nearly 2,000 adults from the UK Biobank, found that drinking red wine and eating cheese was associated with greater cognitive acuity "in our later years."

"I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down," said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State. "While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways."

For the study, participants completed multiple "Fluid Intelligence Tests (FIT)," which, according to the researchers, "provide an in-time snapshot of an individual's ability to 'think on the fly,'" and also reported their food-and-alcohol consumption. The diet questionnaire specifically asked them about their daily intake of "fresh fruit, dried fruit, raw vegetables and salad, cooked vegetables, oily fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereal, tea and coffee, beer and cider, red wine, white wine and champaign and liquor," said the study.

Read on for the "four most significant findings" that the researchers discovered in this study. And for some clear reasons why you shouldn't overdo it in the wine department, make sure you read up on the Ugly Effects of Drinking Wine You Don't Even Know About, According to Experts.


One Major Side Effect of Drinking Red Wine, Says New Study

It's well-known that drinking wine in moderation may have several science-backed health benefits. As Kelli McGrane, MS, RD, a registered dietitian for the food-tracking app Lose It! explained to us, moderate wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, is known to help protect against diabetes, and may help increase your body's level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. One study published in the journal BMC Medicine even found that people who drink between two and seven glasses of wine per week were less likely to suffer from depression.

But, according to a study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University and published in December in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, there's yet another positive side effect to drinking wine—well, red wine, specifically—and consider it an added bonus that you can pair it with cheese and still reap the health benefits. The study, which drew on data of nearly 2,000 adults from the UK Biobank, found that drinking red wine and eating cheese was associated with greater cognitive acuity "in our later years."

"I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down," said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State. "While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways."

For the study, participants completed multiple "Fluid Intelligence Tests (FIT)," which, according to the researchers, "provide an in-time snapshot of an individual's ability to 'think on the fly,'" and also reported their food-and-alcohol consumption. The diet questionnaire specifically asked them about their daily intake of "fresh fruit, dried fruit, raw vegetables and salad, cooked vegetables, oily fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereal, tea and coffee, beer and cider, red wine, white wine and champaign and liquor," said the study.

Read on for the "four most significant findings" that the researchers discovered in this study. And for some clear reasons why you shouldn't overdo it in the wine department, make sure you read up on the Ugly Effects of Drinking Wine You Don't Even Know About, According to Experts.


One Major Side Effect of Drinking Red Wine, Says New Study

It's well-known that drinking wine in moderation may have several science-backed health benefits. As Kelli McGrane, MS, RD, a registered dietitian for the food-tracking app Lose It! explained to us, moderate wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, is known to help protect against diabetes, and may help increase your body's level of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. One study published in the journal BMC Medicine even found that people who drink between two and seven glasses of wine per week were less likely to suffer from depression.

But, according to a study conducted by researchers at Iowa State University and published in December in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, there's yet another positive side effect to drinking wine—well, red wine, specifically—and consider it an added bonus that you can pair it with cheese and still reap the health benefits. The study, which drew on data of nearly 2,000 adults from the UK Biobank, found that drinking red wine and eating cheese was associated with greater cognitive acuity "in our later years."

"I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down," said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition at Iowa State. "While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways."

For the study, participants completed multiple "Fluid Intelligence Tests (FIT)," which, according to the researchers, "provide an in-time snapshot of an individual's ability to 'think on the fly,'" and also reported their food-and-alcohol consumption. The diet questionnaire specifically asked them about their daily intake of "fresh fruit, dried fruit, raw vegetables and salad, cooked vegetables, oily fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereal, tea and coffee, beer and cider, red wine, white wine and champaign and liquor," said the study.

Read on for the "four most significant findings" that the researchers discovered in this study. And for some clear reasons why you shouldn't overdo it in the wine department, make sure you read up on the Ugly Effects of Drinking Wine You Don't Even Know About, According to Experts.


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